icon_iThoughts

Type:
Productivity

System:
iOS & Mac

Cost:
$9.99 & $47.99*

One might not be able to tell from my desk, but I’m actually kind of an organization freak. Not necessarily a neat freak (though I do love myself a good rug vacuuming), but instead I just like to put everything in its place. No no, this isn’t some deep-rooted psychological issue. (This time.) Life can be . . . hectic. But despite how fast-paced things are, and how I’m being pulled every which way, I continue to cultivate projects, ideas, and goals up in the vast reaches of my cerebral cortex. But how do I find time to manage the results of all my firing synapses?

Enter iThoughts, a fantastic mind mapping App available on iPhone/iPad, and also on the Mac. Sorry PC pals and Droid dudes (and dudettes), but since most of you have an iDevice, I think you’re covered, and if you’re not . . . well that’s irrelevant, isn’t it? Oh, but what is a mind map?

A mind map is a diagram used to visually organize information. It is often created around a single concept, drawn as an image in the center of a blank landscape page, to which associated representations of ideas such as images, words and parts of words are added.

The beauty of iThoughts is that it allows someone to create a series of customizable mind maps, each with a multitude of connected thoughts, media elements and research. But what makes this specific mind mapping App so great?

Continue Reading »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell News ConferenceBy now, most of us are familiar with the seemingly endless rash of deplorable public embarrassments facing the NFL.

Adrian Peterson, once upon a time viewed as squeaky clean as Derek Jeter or Michael J. Fox, turns out to have allegedly physically harmed a child. Then, he makes matters even worse for himself and the league by admitting to smoking pot while out on bail, breaking the rules of both common sense and the law.

Ravens running back Ray Rice punches out his then fiancée in a hotel elevator, shining a light on domestic violence across the league. Carolina Panther Greg Hardy makes headlines for assaulting his former girlfriend and threatening her life. The league then fails miserably in its attempt to manage the media and public reaction to its response to the domestic violence situation, putting NFL football in the news for reasons that have nothing to do with the play on the field.

The list of criminal behaviors on display this season among NFL players, owners and executives for things such as DWI, domestic violence, theft, murder, drug abuse and general abuse of power goes on and on. And, let us not forget all the protests and negative headlines regarding the way Daniel Snyder, owner of the Washington Redskins, has refused to change the name and logo of the team to something that doesn’t offend millions of Americans, not to mention fans of the team and the NFL.

Continue Reading »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

Volatility ruled last week, with markets staging major swings nearly every day, a pattern that began earlier this month with the S&P 500 moving 1 percent or more in either direction on eight days.  The market, in fact, has lost over $1.14 trillion since the peak at the middle of September and closed the week down about 1 percent after staging an impressive rally Friday to end at 16,380. Volatility culprits have been concerns about growth overseas, plunging crude oil prices, yield-curve outlook and yes, even Ebola.  (Or maybe, as reports have suggested over the weekend, just catching up to the real economy.)

Elsewhere:

  • Yes, Ebola dominated, with headlines and misinformation fanning fear factors;  However, NYT Dealbook reported in an interesting not using World Bank figures that the outbreak will have an economic drain of as much as $32.6 billion by the end of next year;
  • President Obama named an Ebola overseer;
  • As the market and world unraveled, media unbundled with HBO announcing a new stand-alone service for streaming that is not subscription based;
  • France economist Jean Tirole won the Noble Prize for Economics for his work on regulating businesses and has since been sitting down for some pretty interesting interviews on everything from the cable business to net neutrality;
  • No real surprise but worth noting that Fidelity Investments named Abby Johnson as its new CEO, taking over from her father, and whose grandfather started the firm in 1946;
  • A Park Ave building topped out last week to become the tallest residential tower in the Western Hemisphere at 1,396 fee; and
  • Royals/Giants. End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Round-up news from across the Atlantic . . .

right-forgotten-erase-past-600The markets went haywire this week, causing several high-profile IPOs to be put on hold, including the planned flotations of Aldermore and Virgin Money, two UK challenger banks. However, it wasn’t all bad news – the shoe lovers amongst us will be pleased to know that Jimmy Choo had a successful first day of trading on the London Stock Exchange, perhaps highlighting the uncorrelated nature of shoe investment (or maybe not!). Read More

A battle of the heavyweights emerged this week over data privacy in Europe. The recent “right to be forgotten” rule allows people to ask Google to remove certain information from appearing in search results. However, the BBC believes there is actually a “right to remember” and will therefore be publishing a list of all BBC stories that are blocked by the search engine. That’ll show ‘em! Read More

International diplomacy reached new heights (or lows) this week. Ahead of the upcoming G20 summit, Tony Abbott, the Australian Prime Minister has bizarrely threatened to “shirt front” Russia’s Vladimir Putin. This Aussie Rules term refers to an illegal tackle whereby a player roughly handles their opponent. A Russian Embassy official branded the comment “immature” before pointing out that, while Abbott may be a fit cyclist, Putin was a judo champion. I know who my money would be on. Read More

In lighter-hearted news, London was troubled last night by the worrying predicament of one dedicated book lover: American tourist, David Willis, found himself locked in the Trafalgar Square branch of book store, Waterstones. In a sign of the world we live in, Willis shunned the idea of calling anybody for help, and instead relied on the incredible power of Twitter. #FreeTheWaterstones1 garnered 9,704 tweets before David was eventually freed. Read More End of Story

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

glass_wall

A few days ago it was announced that Marvin Ellison, formerly of Home Depot will be taking the reigns as CEO of struggling retailer JCPenney.  The announcement was met with strong reception driving up the company’s stock prices.  Ellison is credited for being a driving force behind Home Depot’s comeback after the housing crisis and the market is hoping he can engineer a repeat performance for the department store.  Alongside reports of Ellison’s success was also mention of the fact that he is the first African American CEO JCPenney has had in its 112-year history, and is now the seventh(!) black CEO in the country.

As a woman of color that is in a senior position at my organization, it is inspiring to see that Ellison’s performance and leadership qualities were heavily touted within coverage of his appointment.  Ellison is clearly qualified for the job and has a proven track record of success.   As I read further I came across an interesting article on ThinkProgress.org that discussed a study examining women or people of color in corporate leadership positions.  The author shared that, “women and people of color are more likely to be promoted to the top of struggling companies, a phenomenon that has been dubbed the ‘glass cliff’.”  No matter what previous performance period researchers looked at, return on equity was significantly negative before a woman and/or a person of color became CEO at a Fortune 500 company between 1996 and 2010, even with a variety of factors that could have an impact taken into account.”

Continue Reading »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print