“While there are promising signs in digital advertising and digital subscriptions, the print business remains under pressure. And our new products are not achieving the business success we expected, even though they are journalistic sensations.”October 1st, 2014: Dean Baquet, Executive Editor, The New York Times

Every year there are reports of newspaper layoffs and a-NewYorkTimes_0newsroom cutbacks at top-tier and respectable organizations as publications decide to dedicate more resources towards digital products. On October 1st, it was announced that The New York Times would be offering a generous buyout package for 100 volunteers or 7.5 percent of its 1,330 newsroom staff. If enough employees don’t step up, there will be a round of layoffs to meet the quota. Reportedly, they’ll have to layoff approximately 15-20 employees, though many notable and veteran journalists did take a buyout.

Working in public relations, we work with the media on a daily basis. Newsroom cutbacks affect us as well. There are fewer and fewer journalists covering more industries and beats. Many online publications hire based on the number of articles a writer can produce in one day making the priorities quantity over quality, which goes against all journalistic standards that print publications try to uphold despite decreasing budgets. The reality is money talks and if print wants to stay around, these publications also have to adapt to the changes of consumer preferences and start increasing revenues in other forms, like digital.

Continue Reading »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

Hack Attack: If you don’t want it read (because it will likely be hacked and made public), don’t email it.  So learned Hollywood bigs this week, as Sony head Amy Pascal and others were victims of the work of Guardians of Peace, an anonymous group that targeted Sony Corp email accounts, which led to pretty juicy headlines (read The New York Post for some of the best coverage especially on pretty racial comments about President Obama’s assumed movie tastes and everything nasty about Angelina Jolie).

Elsewhere:

  • Crude-oil prices continue to sink, sending stocks sharply lower, a positive for consumers at the pump but a drag on oil-producing companies and an increase in talk of deflation on the overall economy;
  • That led to the markets biggest weekly loss in three years, with the Dow plunging 3.8 percent for the week and some 315 points alone on Friday to end at 17,280;
  • Bloomberg, the terminals chief, seems to be cleaning house, making some terminal decisions for at least one long timer, with News Editor-in-Chief Matt Winkler stepping down, replaced by John Micklethwait from The Economist; Winkler will assume the new role of emeritus editor-in-chief;
  • San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner was named Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year;
  • Ebola fighters were named Time people of the year;
  • Congress passed a spending bill to avoid a government shutdown; and
  • In a win for Bitcoins, Microsoft will allow the currency to be used to pay for certain products. End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Round-up news from across the Atlantic . . . kate middleton

 

“The British are coming!”… well, in fact they have been. Everybody’s favourite Brits, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, spent some time across the pond this week, busying themselves with numerous meals, presidential meetings, and even managing to fit in a basketball game. Lebron James is said to have broken royal protocol by placing his arm around Kate during a photograph, but fortunately the Duchess was not offended!

John Micklethwait is leaving The Economist after 27 years to join Bloomberg News as Editor-in-Chief. He’ll be moving to NYC for this role, so keep your eyes peeled for his replacement in London!

Continue Reading »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

investec

While inappropriate and insensitive comments related to emotionally charged events are par for the course on social media today, one made an appearance in an unlikely place – a sell-side equity analyst’s research note. Specifically, an analyst at Investec, a British and South African Bank, headlined a research note discussing regulatory constraints placed upon Standard Chartered with the title “I Can’t Breath” in reference to Eric Garner’s last words.

Moreover, when contacted by the FT, the analyst, Ian Gordon, not only confirmed that the title was meant to refer to the tragic death of Mr. Garner, but that his original language had called Mr. Garner’s death and StanChart’s regulatory troubles “both examples of abuse of power or authoritarian control gone wrong,” though this was edited out by Investec’s compliance professionals.

Mr. Gordon then went ahead and doubled down on his point of view by saying that “The parallel, or lack of parallel, is that in the Garner case you see widespread anger and uprising in the public…In the case of StanChart — and yes, it is very different circumstances — but the silence of the UK government is perverse given the circumstances. StanChart itself is gagged.”

Continue Reading »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Welcome back to another exciting excuse to not fast-forward through commercials on your DVR, but instead to watch them with the boundless curiosity of a young child. In this edition of ad watch, we’re going to take a stroll into the controversial part of town (sometimes confused with Bridgeport, CT) to visit our friends at Verizon FiOS. Pull on your comfy pants, grab some popcorn, and prepare yourself for an all-too-brief discussion of an ad series that isn’t at all half-as— oh sorry, half-fast.

Before we jump in, however, why not watch the commercial to the right?

The world isn’t unfamiliar with ads that put a clever spin on words to sound like something else (which might be occasionally suggestive). Have you ever shipped your pants? Or conversed with your chums about the big gas prices the country is contending with? K-Mart has made efforts to put itself in the center of both those enthralling topics in the past. Personally, I thought these commercials were relatively hilarious and effective. In an age where the average consumer skips through commercials with a convenient button press, advertisers really need to go above and beyond to be memorable. And Youtube views don’t lie on either of these commercials. When is the last time you had a video with a million views on it? That’s what I thought.

Continue Reading »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print