Dilma Rousseff, the incumbent, at a celebratory event following her victory in Brazil’s Presidential Elections.

Dilma Rousseff, the incumbent, at a celebratory event following her victory in Brazil’s Presidential Elections.

The results are in and, in Brazil’s closest presidential election ever, the incumbent Dilma Rousseff (Worker’s Party, 51.6% of the votes) retained her position as president of Latin America’s largest economy after beating out former Minas Gerais governor Aécio Neves (Brazilian Social Democracy Party, 48.4% of the votes).

In our last post on the issue, we had framed this battle as one between voters who prioritize economic reform, and thus would support Aécio, versus voters who prioritize social programs, thus supporting Dilma. This is precisely how the result played out. Dilma won most of the

more rural and dependent Northern states, particularly the Northeast, whereas Aécio won most of the southern, more developed states.

As predicted, financial markets did not receive the news well. The country’s currency, the Real, has considerably weakened since the news, down to $2.53 at the time of this post, a new nine and a half year low. The country’s stock exchange, the Bovespa, is also facing a steep selloff.

Yet, there is a strong sentiment among Brazilians that while conceding the battle to the status quo, the fight for change in Brazil is certainly not over. Social media channels have exploded with posts along the lines of “just wait till 2018 [the next Brazilian election]”, or “this was a great development for Brazil [referring to the close results]”. As such, some expect Dilma to adopt a more conciliatory role in some regards to protect her party’s position for the 2018 elections.

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Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

The “national hyperventilation” (NPR) over the “scream-fire-in-a-crowded-theatre”  coverage (me) of Ebola continued as a viral virus, with a doctor now contaminated in New York moving to center stage with surprisingly swift action taken by those in charge here amid lessons learned from Dallas no doubt.  The coverage will continue with big precautions no doubt put in place and HazMat costumes a Halloween rage (so not creative).

Elsewhere:

  • The markets continued a volatile path with the broader indexes boasting their biggest weekly gains in more than a year, and the Dow up 2.6 percent on the week to end at 16,805;
  • Apple posted record year-end results and Microsoft revenue increased as Amazon recorded steep losses and saw its stock tumble;
  • Normally peaceful Ottawa witnessed a gunman kill a Canadian soldier;
  • Consumer giant P&G announced senior-management changes in a bid for a more focused company and amid talk on CEO succession plans;
  • Washington Post Editor and “Watergate Warrior” (NYT) Ben Bradlee died, called in memorials the last of “lion-king” newspaper editors;
  • The Sunday New York Post columnist Terry Keenan died, a pioneering financial journalist who was the first to report live from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for CNN; and
  • And outside of media circles but a media celebrity himself, Oscar de la Renta, fashion luminary, died. End of Story
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Round-up news from across the Atlantic . . .

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Living up to the British stereotype, we’re kicking off with a story about The Queen this week. Her Majesty tweeted for the first time today through the @BritishMonarchy account as she launched the new ‘Information Age’ exhibition at the Science Museum. We also like to speculate that she is an avid Snapchatter in her private life. Read More

The supermarket chain Tesco is famous for the slogan “Every little helps” and it appears they could be doing with a little help of their own as they announced this week that their profits have dropped by 92%. The firm has been struggling since it was uncovered that its half year profit expectations had been overstated by close to £250 million. Read More

Europe had flashbacks to the Cold War this week as Sweden went on the hunt for a mini-submarine in its waters which, it said, was “probably” Russian. The search, which has now been called off after several days, was described by a Swedish Rear Admiral as like “looking for Jesus…everyone knows who he is, but no one has seen him.” Read More

Lord Hill has been confirmed as the EU commissioner for financial services after a second round of questioning from MEPs. In an unusual step, Lord Hill was recalled by MEPs but in the end was voted in by a resounding margin of 45-13 committee members. Read More

On that note, that tumultuous relationship between Britain and the EU hit several bumps in the road this week. Jose Barroso, the outgoing President of the European Commission, argued that the UK would have “zero” influence if it were to leave the EU. Ever a man of the people, Prime Minister Cameron has defiantly reminded Mr. Barroso that his real bosses are the citizens of the United Kingdom, and that he will serve them as opposed to “pandering” to the EU. Read More

If that wasn’t enough, and reminiscent of a messy divorce proceedings, the EU has today demanded £1.7 million from the United Kingdom arguing that previous budget contributions have been based on an understatement of the size of the UK economy. Not one to go down without a fight, the Chancellor described the decision as having been made by “junior officials” in the “bowels” of the commission.  Read More End of Story

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Walk_Blog_header
October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and countless campaigns are in full swing to spread the word and raise money for the cause. When an entire month is dedicated to breast cancer, almost every city in America hosts a fundraising walk and NFL teams incorporate pink into their game day uniform, it is safe to say that it is unarguably one of the most successful healthcare campaigns around. What is it about breast cancer that makes it such a successful philanthropic campaign?

One reason could be the undeniable passion of its supporters. People who participate in these initiatives often have personal ties to the cause and sincerely care about helping women and men with breast cancer. After all, one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and this year more than 2,240 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in men.

With passion at the foundation, fundraising becomes a community effort. Each October, thousands of products are adorned with pink ribbons, colored pink or otherwise sold with a promise of a small portion of the total cost being donated to support breast cancer awareness or research. Hundreds of organizations partner with national and local races, walks, climbs and other events that provide emotional uplift, a sense of unity and an opportunity to raise money for the cause. The most successful partnerships are those that are transparent and accountable when it comes to using money raised for breast cancer support and research.

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icon_iThoughts

Type:
Productivity

System:
iOS & Mac

Cost:
$9.99 & $47.99*

One might not be able to tell from my desk, but I’m actually kind of an organization freak. Not necessarily a neat freak (though I do love myself a good rug vacuuming), but instead I just like to put everything in its place. No no, this isn’t some deep-rooted psychological issue. (This time.) Life can be . . . hectic. But despite how fast-paced things are, and how I’m being pulled every which way, I continue to cultivate projects, ideas, and goals up in the vast reaches of my cerebral cortex. But how do I find time to manage the results of all my firing synapses?

Enter iThoughts, a fantastic mind mapping App available on iPhone/iPad, and also on the Mac. Sorry PC pals and Droid dudes (and dudettes), but since most of you have an iDevice, I think you’re covered, and if you’re not . . . well that’s irrelevant, isn’t it? Oh, but what is a mind map?

A mind map is a diagram used to visually organize information. It is often created around a single concept, drawn as an image in the center of a blank landscape page, to which associated representations of ideas such as images, words and parts of words are added.

The beauty of iThoughts is that it allows someone to create a series of customizable mind maps, each with a multitude of connected thoughts, media elements and research. But what makes this specific mind mapping App so great?

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