Media Navel Gaze: October 10, 2011

Jonathan Mak's Apple Logo for Steve JobsThe Week Unpeeled

The death of Steve Jobs was understandably central focus of the media last week, with many outlets issuing special editions (great one from BloombergBusinessweek whose layout was as simple and elegant as Apple’s designs), and the tributes highlighting his genius in technology/design and branding/marketing. (Did you know that MoMA has 25 Apple products in its permanent collection?  Thanks, James Stewart in The New York Times on Saturday.) One of the best tributes was the graphic to the right created by a Hong Kong design student, Jonathan Mak, 19, which became viral wallpaper but was still simple, elegant and anything but cute.

Elsewhere:

  • The US jobs picture improved a bit, with non-farm payroll rising by 103,000 in September and the August number revised upward to 57,000 from zero;
  • Walt Disney CEO Iger announced plans to retire in 2015;
  • Google said it would provide YouTube $100 million to help create original content;
  • Chris Christie said he would not run for president, claiming “this is not my time”;
  • Nobel Peace Prize awarded to three women in Africa and the Middle East (see below); and
  • The Dow climbed 1.7 percent to end at 11,103, rising for the second week in a row.

Nobel Winner with Journo Ties

Nobel prize for peace was awarded to three women last week, including Tawakkul Karman, a Yemeni journalist and human-rights activist who started Women Journalists without Chains in 2005, which has been advocating freedom for SMS news services, which had been controlled by the government. Interesting to note that a digital-news-type service was part of the peace process.

Occupy Wall Street Gains More Than Occupiers

The numbers are definitely growing and now the media attention from old-school traditional sources, with even some suggesting logos (The New York Times op-art over the weekend); Andrew Ross Sorkin checking out the site on behalf of CEOs for safety?; a few prominent and positive op-ed pieces; occupiers spreading to other cities; and the second edition of The Occupied Wall Street Journal, a four-page very broad broadsheet, with no masthead but pretty good graphics and photos.  More and more news outlets are setting up tripods and trucks downtown.  This story is not going away anytime soon and gaining ground through all media channels. CJP

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