Posts Tagged ‘Jake Daubenspeck’

Dominated by a furious second-half comeback, a 37 minute power outage, and what Kanye West would undoubtedly call "one of the best halftime performances OF ALL TIME," the general consensus is that Super Bowl XLVII was not nearly as much of a coup for on-air advertisements as 2012's event. Whereas the previous two years featured equal parts impassioned and hilarious ads, the tops trend for 2013 was tame, safe ads featuring fairly common themes.

“Jake Silver” – A Look at the Stats

By my unofficial count, there were 64 non-NFL and non-CBS ad spots in this year's game. Some observations:

  • 27% of ads were for car companies (quite similar to last year's 25%)
  • 40% of ads were for food/beverage products (way up from 20% last year)
  • 21% of ads featured consumer products/services (similar to last year's 16%)
  • Five movie ads were broadcast, including one promoting the new Fast & Furious franchise entry (which now has as many episodes as Spider-Man has comic books)
  • Just three ads—5% total—were for online specific-platforms/services, down even from last year's meager total of 8%

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Now, let me preface this by saying that I'm the first one to admit that there is such a thing as a stupid question.

Come on, don't defend it. We've all heard the adage that "there is no such thing as a stupid question." But if we're being honest here, that's simply not true. I personally know this in large part because I've asked PLENTY of stupid questions in my time.

Still, managers have made careers (or at least motivational posters) out of this phrase (cynics have made their own posters, as well). And it's partly (or even mostly) true. Employees benefit from being in an environment where questions and open dialogue are encouraged, not shunned. After all, an intern can't simply Google "how should I pitch this byline article." That being said, I bet everyone has seen someone take this mantra to its extreme - as a free pass to abandon their own creative and problem-solving faculties.

This is all part of why I'm of the opinion that the ability to ask the right questions is one of the greatest tools in predicting their future success in the workplace - PR or otherwise. Entire careers are built off of having the gift of asking the right questions at the right time (reporters, lawyers, salespeople). PR is no different. I help run Prosek Partners' internship program and I can say that one of the biggest things I look at when interviewing a candidate (or in evaluating their performance) is their ability to ask the right questions. We can't (and don't) expect people to know everything about PR or about the financial services industry. But we do prefer if they can ask smart, targeted questions that will get them on the road to understanding.

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Source: Someecards.com

Even if you have thick skin, the realization that someone has defriended you on Facebook can leave your ego pretty bruised. If said “defriender” isn’t someone who you have gotten in a recent fight with (like a friend or an ex) and isn’t someone who is trying to hide content from you (such as a daughter, son or younger relative), figuring out why you were defriended can be quite a puzzle. You can also rule out the possibility that it was an accident. The act of defriending is a deliberate move, as you must literally go to the person’s profile page and click “Remove as Friend” to do so. So what, exactly, is defriender’s problem with you?

Perhaps defriender’s issue isn’t with you, but with your social media communication style. Do your statuses inform the Facebook world of your every waking move, including the fact that you had Cinnamon Toast Crunch for breakfast? Are you clogging your friend’s newsfeeds with relationship updates because you and your significant other “complicated” Monday, “open” Tuesday and “single” by Friday? Do your 35 Facebook albums solely consist of pictures of your cat? Then you’re guilty of meaningless social media over-sharing; who can blame defriender for wanting to eliminate you from his or her newsfeed?

Apparently, the motives behind why someone might defriend you on Facebook resemble the reasons why someone might unlike, unfollow, unsubscribe or otherwise “break up” with your brand online. According to a recent article by PR Daily, the main reasons why people “break up” with brands is because posts either become too frequent, or content becomes too repetitive. According to a similar New York Times article by Ciara Byrne, a new study by Exact Market and CoTweet reveals 90 percent of consumers say that they have “broken up” with a brand via Facebook, email or Twitter.

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With two huge-market teams facing off in this year’s Super Bowl, odds were that you had a rooting interest in yesterday’s championship game. Being an Eagles fan, I, however, did not. Fortunately, that left plenty of time for me to root for the advertising industry!

By my unofficial tally, a quarter of all ads this year were for car companies. Food/drink products were featured in roughly 20 percent of ads and consumer products took up about 16 percent of all ads. Online services (such as Hulu, Cars.com and Go Daddy, which kind of counts) came it at only 8 percent. Please note that these stats don't take into account the 6,198 ads that NBC ran for its new show, Smash.

Notable Successes and Failures

Honda stole the show with its spot for the CRV, which featured Matthew Broderick reprising his role from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. If you haven't already, check out the full version online. Honda plays into one of the strongest of all feelings - nostalgia - with a spot that any Ferris Bueller fan can't help but watch with a permanent smile on their face. It’s the same feeling on which VW rose to fame with their mini-Vader spot.

For sheer laughs, E*Trade's baby was the biggest hit, at least for the Super Bowl party I attended. (Note: CJP represents E*Trade and this ad campaign, and I fully realize that this looks like a shameless plug for our client. But honestly, I call ‘em like I see ‘em, and from what I saw, this ad got the biggest laughs of the night!)

Honorable mention goes to Pepsi's ad, which featured a star-studded roster (capped by Elton John) that fell short and had viewers waiting for a punch line for a grueling full minute of airtime. However, in the last 4 seconds of the spot, Flava Flav makes an unexplainable appearance to shout his trademark “Yeah, boooooooy!” phrase. And you know what? It somehow works. Kudos to Pepsi for avoiding what could have been a train wreck.

(MUCH MORE AFTER THE JUMP)

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“When you get into the end zone, act like you’ve been there before.” Have you ever heard this saying? If you’re a sports fan, you probably have (though you it’s rarely exemplified by any of the professional athletes you see on TV). Taken literally, it means that if you happen to find yourself playing football and happen to score a touchdown, you shouldn’t dance around like a fool who is seemingly surprised by his newfound success. Suggested protocol? Hi-five a teammate or two, sure, but then hand the ball right to the referee and get back to the bench and your job.

This adage obviously has its roots on the football gridiron, but since very few of us are going to be scoring touchdowns anytime soon, let’s focus on the deeper meaning. “Act like you’ve been there before” is a reminder that personal success should be expected – not come a surprise to you or to anyone else. Why is it expected? Because you’ve worked your tail off to get there! It’s also a call for humility, recognizing that you are where you are due to, in large part, the efforts of your entire team. And I’d say that these two personality traits – humility and hard work (with the confidence & expectation that it will lead to success) – are two critically important qualities to have, whether you’re an athlete or a PR practitioner. And if you disagree, ask yourself – would you really want to have a desk next to someone like DeSean Jackson?

Back to professional athletes for a minute. Recently, soccer fans had a rare opportunity to witness the “act like you’ve been there before” adage unfold before their eyes. Tim Howard, of Team USA World Cup fame, was tending goal for Everton, his English Premier League team, two nights ago during a home game. Standing just in front of his own net, Howard fielded a ball and let fly with a booming clearing kick. Partly due to a sudden and intensely high wind, the kicked ball flew through the air for a full 70 yards, to the opposite end of the field. It took one bounce, clear over the head of the opposing goaltender, and inexplicitly found its way into the back of the net. Goal, Tim Howard, from 90+ yards out.

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