Posts Tagged ‘LinkedIn’


Social Media Log-InCollege seniors around the country breathed a collective sigh of relief last week when the U.S. Senate decided not to advance the new Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, also known as CISPA.  A new clause in the bill recently passed by the U.S. House of Representatives would have allowed businesses and the U.S. Government full access to individuals’ personal social media pages as a way to crackdown on cybercrime.

While this particular version of the bill is now considered dead, legislators are re-writing a similar version that could be more protective of citizen privacy.  But if and when a version of this does get passed, professionals nationwide have some serious self-reflection to do.

For many, professional accomplishments are often prioritized ahead of other life goals such as when to start a family or at what age to retire.  So just imagine what will become of us if one of the few places we truly express our personality, our personal social media pages, can now be considered an extension of one’s resume.  Will we be forced to permanently keep our personal pages business-casual?

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Whoever the makers of those fancy, extra weight, ivory colored “resume paper” packets are (which typically cost you $20 to print one nice document), they’re going to have to find new jobs. In a recent Forbes article, I learned that Facebook may have set its sights on its next offering – an online recruiting platform à la industry heavyweight and Empire State Building neighbor, LinkedIn. The article suggests Facebook will be hard-pressed to dethrone what has become the foremost recruiting tool for HR executives and search firms alike. And with LinkedIn’s current valuation somewhere north of $10B, it is less likely Zuckerberg will consider pulling another Instragram-like buyout of its social peer.

What looks like it could be the beginning of a playground turf war between the two social powerhouses leads me to a definite conclusion. The days of paper resumes are dead. I can’t even count how many times I marched my one-page proclamation of worthiness (AKA: my resume) into the career development center at my university. I looked for suggestions on how to bolster the descriptions of my professional experiences and highlight, in a relevant way, the parts that would bring out the more intangible skills I had developed, my personality and work ethic. It always seemed so counterintuitive that the first thing potential employers would “see” of me was a voice-less, color-less document which would probably sit in the middle of a stack, waiting to be read, or have coffee spilled on it, or be lost in the shuffle.

As has become the case with many of the more “traditional” ways we conduct business, the job search and recruiting process has largely moved online. As such, so have the ways we share information with potential employers and those we want to network with.

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The Week Unpeeled

Amid discussions this week that Google’s privacy or not-so-much privacy tactics include sharing our data across all its platforms (at least say “thank you”), a story in The Wall Street Journal last week (Tuesday, Feb 28 2012) called Google+ a “virtual ghost town.”  That was definitely an “ouch,” but the story carried an interesting graphic on average number of minutes per visitor on social networking sites in January: Facebook wins (no surprise) at  405 minutes , or almost an hour a day.  The upstart Pinterest tied with Tumbler at 89 minutes and beat out Linkedin, Myspace and Twitter combined by almost double.  Maybe that’s beginner’s luck, and I guess you don’t need to spend much time on Twitter to cast 140 characters.   Google+ tallied, however, only three minutes, compared with Myspace’s eight minutes (thank you, Justin, no doubt).  Updates needed in a few months, no doubt.

Elsewhere:

  • GM idled the Volt;
  • Tornadoes ripped through the heartland;
  • Gas prices soared;
  • James Murdoch quit News International; Rupert’s other Sun launched its Sunday edition and then was hit with allegations of corruption (how much smoke is needed here?)
  • Occupy London were evicted from St Paul’s site;
  • Trash talk hit new levels with conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh, and Obama jumped in to defend Georgetown law school target on topic of birth control;
  • Gordon Gekko channels Michael Douglas in PSAs to confront greed on behalf of the FBI (isn’t truth better than fiction?)
  • Apple is holding March 7 presser where we will all be surprised if the iPad 3 is not unveiled;
  • Fed Chief Bernanke said the US economic recovery is “uneven and modest” (hope he didn’t stay up all night figuring that out);
  • The number of weddings in the UK has gone up by 3.7 percent in a year and  75 percent of Brits say they are content with their lives (related?); and
  • The Dow ended the week lower for the first time in three, closing at 12,977 after flirting with 13,000 all week and even teased with one close above this number that the media think is so important (why?). CJP

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I am endlessly fascinated by the way people interact with their online networks. Call me nerdy, but I was so pumped the other day when I had an old journalist connection contact me with a request on LinkedIn. The request? Make an introduction for her friend at Groupon to one of my old tech pals. It was LinkedIn at its finest. In a matter of minutes, I made a new connection, strengthened my credibility with my journalist contact, and probably helped out my old pal.

While many people I know tend to think of LinkedIn as intrusive (and only used by headhunters), I tend to think of it as a brilliant way to network with people you might not ever come in contact with otherwise. If you use it correctly, the opportunities are endless.

Case in point, I’m a huge fan of Frank Eliason, SVP of Social Media at Citi. Well known for his work at Comcast, and now at Citi, I recently reached out to him to let him know. He responded, we chatted, and accepted my invitation to connect. Mr. Eliason is now in my network, and I’m certain we’ll chat again in the future.

While this is only one minor example, I can’t count the number of times I’ve used LinkedIn to get out there, get noticed and meet people—and in some cases turn the initial online interaction into an offline one. LinkedIn breaks down the barriers, and has put me in front of people I might not yet have had the opportunity to meet. Try it out! CJP


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No Comments » Written on January 19th, 2012 by
Categories: From the News, Social Media
Tags: , , ,

Google PlusIn recent news, apparently I’m a blogger who follows surveys and studies in an attempt to appear more intellectual. In more important and, dare I say, more relevant news, a recent Bloomberg/YouGov survey was released about a month after Google+ opened its doors to the public. The survey's purpose is to assess the social media trends and outlook potential of Google’s new venture after a year's time, as well as to compare it against its competitors. The results were nothing but fascinating. And we’re walking...

So, have you heard of Google+? Oh, good. You’re on top of things then, my intelligent friend. Apparently Google is this highly successful technology firm which employs nearly 25,000 people. But jobs and innovations aren't important; what IS important is the ever-growing popularity of rich social media applications and how they affect us, of course! When Google+ became available for public consumption, it almost immediately became a hot commodity. This was aided by the fact that it was primarily only available by invite only, just as Gmail was when it first was introduced in 2004. Regardless of the reasons, however, Google+’s popularity is growing.

Already 13% of adult Internet users in the US have signed up for a Google+ account with another 9% planning to sign up in the next 12 months.  Those signing up are also highly engaged:

  • 45% of users report reading content once a day or more (only Facebook’s 62% is higher among social networks)
  • 46% of Google+ users report creating content (e.g., creating updates; posting links) at least once a week.  This is on par with Twitter (42%) – which focuses on easy content creation

Did you think the above stats were brutally and/or astoundingly interesting? Wonderful—but wait! There’s more!

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