Posts Tagged ‘Media Navel Gaze’

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

Ebola news and misinformation about the disease dominated coverage at the end of the week amid reports on the first death in the US and the first case that was actually contracted here by a health-care worker who treated the victim in Dallas while in full protective gear.  The Texas hospital and health officials seemed to control the message—along with countless “experts”—with seemingly and surprisingly little commentary from the CDC.

Elsewhere:

  • The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Kailash Satyarthi, Indian children’s rights advocate, and Malala Yousafzai, outspoken schoolgirl in Pakistan who was shot in the head by the Taliban;
  • The Dow fell some 2.7 percent for the week, erasing all its gains made in 2014, to end at 16,544, dragged down in large part by concerns about overseas economic growth
  • Twitter sues the U.S. to make government data requests public, claiming violations of the First Amendment;
  • Michael Bloomberg is knighted for his “prodigious entrepreneurial and philanthropic endeavors” in the UK; and
  • The U.S. Supreme Court let stand lower-court rulings last week on bans against gay marriage in five states, effectively expanding the rights for unions to 24 states. End of Story
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Media Navel Gaze The Week Unpeeled

Although the controversy at the NFL continued to hold the media’s attention stage most of the week, financial news shifted its focus late to the Alibaba Group stock listing, with the Chinese e-commerce company pricing at $68 per share, and surging some 38 percent, making it the largest IPO in the US, raising at least $21.8 billion with a market value of $231 billion, and as The Wall Street Journal noted, larger than Procter & Gamble.

Elsewhere:

  • Oracle founder Larry Ellison stepped down as CEO, the tech behemoth’s only chief since it was launched in 1977;
  • The Scots voted to stay in the UK following a closely watched and heated campaign and British Prime Minister David Cameron quickly announced a surprise proposal that will give more powers to Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England;
  • The Royal and Ancient Golf Club voted to admit females, reversing a 260- year-old policy;
  • NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced a new conduct committee at a press conference last week amid the second week of the domestic-violence scandal that has hit the league; The Baltimore Ravens organized a Ray Rice jersey exchange, while Nike terminated its endorsement deal with NFL star Adrian Peterson but no word on the company’s NFL partnerships;
  • The Dow Jones recorded another new high, ending the week 1.7 percent higher to close at 17,279 based in part of comments from Fed Chief Janet Yellen that rates will stay low; and
  • Vogue has made it official, announcing we have made it to the “Era of the Booty,” which only means the editors missed out on the Sir Mix-a-Lot era who went there a long time ago. End of Story
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Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

Geopolitics dominated headlines in a news-filled week as tensions escalated overseas with ISIS beheading a second US journalist and President Obama promising a long-term fight against the extremist group, while NATO leaders met in Wales to discuss sanctions on Moscow amid a supposed truce between Russia and the Ukraine.

Elsewhere

  • Alibaba continued to prepare for its IPO, with recent filings valuing the company at $155 billion, one of the largest in the US;
  • The US jobs report showed employers added about 142,000 to their payroll in August, making it one of the slowest months of the year;
  • Hackers continued to make news, breaking into Web sites and stealing data, with one of the latest breaches at the federal health site HealthCare.gov;
  • Michael Bloomberg will retake control Bloomberg;
  • Speculation increased that Jill Abramson, the former New York Times executive editor, may work at Vanity Fair;
  • Katharine Weymouth, the publisher and last of the ruling Graham family, is stepping down from The Washington Post post acquisition of the newspaper by Jeff Bezos of Amazon;
  • Brooklyn-based Vice Media is getting bigger with a VC investment, its second cash infusion in recent weeks;
  • The NFL will begin Thursday night football weekly this week;
  • A 65-ton dinosaur was discovered in Argentina;
  • Brangelina happened; and
  • Sadly, the red carpet got a bit safer and certainly a lot duller. End of Story
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Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

The media world and the rest of us witnessed in total horror the beheading of reporter James Foley by ISIS, the Islamic State, which dominated headlines and broadcasts and forced President Obama to stage one of his most somber and angry press conferences ever.  The image has sparked global outrage but also raised serious conversations about responsible coverage.  Publications like The New York Post carried a picture of the execution on its front page while seemingly much of the media, reportedly led by @ladyliberty1885, began a sort of anti-viral viral campaign tagged #ISISmediablackout calling for the social media world to stop tweeting the beheading picture. Twitter has also reportedly said it would suspend accounts that carried the photo, which all taken together is an extreme example of a media blackout and one supported by the media themselves.

Elsewhere:

  • The Ice Bucket Challenge seemed to actually grow last week in popularity, coverage and originality (my vote goes to Dave Groll’s challenge); money raised so far for the ALS charity reached over $70 billion;
  • Uber names David Plouffe, former Obama campaign manager and senior advisor, as its senior veep of strategy and policy (think acquisitions/ contract/union negotiations for the private car-sharing service), a move that produced considerable ink for such a high-power recruitment;  Plouffe was also known for his storytelling messaging, so communications will likely take a more grassroots/shared economy turn;
  • Snapchat will begin posting news and ads called Snapchat Discovery;
  • The NFL may ask for its half-time performers to pay to appear, which could lead to interesting malfunctions if you’re now a paying customer;
  • BofA is paying a record $17 billion settlement over mortgage-lending practices;
  • The Dow ended the week just above 17,000 and is now up 2.6 percent for the year; and
  • The Is Cool: Mo’Ne Davis, the 13-year dynamo pitcher is the first Little Leaguer to make the cover of Sports Illustrated and she wants to be a point guard for the WNBA (ouch, MLB). End of Story
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Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

Leading headlines switched between the fighting in Iraq and the Ukraine all week, with focus late on new conflicts between Russia and the former Soviet state that sent stocks lower and investors into “safer” instruments like bonds.  The Dow ended the week down 0.7 percent at 16,662.

Elsewhere:

  • News images of the violence in Missouri, however, has visually seemed to make the town of Ferguson more dangerous than in political fights overseas, with the story gaining momentum, accounting for two stories alone on the front page of The New York Times on Sunday;
  • Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has resigned, which means more aid likely now from the US to Iraq;
  • Texas Gov. Perry, an expected presidential candidate, was indicted on charges of alleged abuse of powers;
  • The co-founders of Current TV, which include Al Gore, are suing Al Jareeza America for allegedly withholding funds owed them;
  • David Gregory is out at NBC’s “Meet the Press” and will be replaced by Chuck Todd amid speculation that he may be headed to CNN;
  • Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall died amid well-deserved ink of praise including one somewhat odd piece in the NYT that death of celebrities do not come in threes; and
  • YOLO makes it to the Oxford Dictionary (thank you, Drake), as well as clickbait, listicle and binge-watch (thank you, OITNB and House of Cards). End of Story
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