Posts Tagged ‘Media Navel Gaze’

Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

Mid-term elections coverage and commentary seemed to be the major focus for most of the week, with Republicans now set to take control of the House and Senate next year, fueling speculation of a renewed focus on such business issues as corporate taxes, financial regulations and the Keystone XL pipeline (NYT and everywhere else); Obama sounded surprisingly positive following the  results and markets rallied to record levels. Elise Stefanik became the youngest women elected at 30 years old to Congress, a Republican from New York.

Elsewhere:

  • The US jobs report for October showed that the national unemployment rate dropped to 5.8 percent and non-farm payroll increased by 214,000 positions, slightly below expectations but prior months were revised upward;
  • The Dow, meanwhile, reached new highs, closing Friday up 1.1 percent for the week at 17,573;
  • The US is sending more troops to Iraq;
  • Tinder Exec demoted to president from CEO (is that a swipe left or right?) after calling boss Barry Diller a below-the-belt term;
  • Detroit to exit from bankruptcy following the approval of its plan;
  • Shake It Off: Taylor Swift exited Spotify; no bankruptcies; and
  • A teenage Target employee (and likely Swift fan) became a Twitter star and guest on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” after his photo was posted online and the world gushed and swooned (a marketing start-up firm claimed ownership of the idea then had to backpedal). Target issued a statement denying any involvement and now Gaze is talking about it, proving #youcanmakesomethingfromnothing and #thisisbetterthanthekardashians. End of Story
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Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

Ebola and ISIS seemed to move below the fold last week with the economy and markets regaining attention after the Bank of Japan announced a surprise stimulus move that made stocks look attractive and sent the Dow to record highs, with blue chips climbing 3.5 percent to end on Friday at 17,390, a record close.

Elsewhere:

  • However, the Fed said it would end its bond-purchase program (no more easy money), also known as QE2, but debate continues on just what will happen next amid big sign of a strengthening economy;
  • No surprise then that US GDP showed an 3.5-percent increase in the third quarter;
  • Gas prices continued to fall to around a national average of $3.00 per gallon;
  • A Virgin Galactic space craft came apart in a test flight killing a pilot and putting on hold Justin Bieber’s trip (yup, he’s on the wait list);
  • Apple is talking about selling products in Iran, or iIran;
  • In other Apple news, Tim Cook came out in Bloomberg Businessweek in a move that received front-page coverage most places commenting on the resonance of the announcement with Goldman Sachs CEO Blankfein calling him the Chief Executive of the Fortune One. End of Story
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Media Navel GazeThe Week Unpeeled

The “national hyperventilation” (NPR) over the “scream-fire-in-a-crowded-theatre”  coverage (me) of Ebola continued as a viral virus, with a doctor now contaminated in New York moving to center stage with surprisingly swift action taken by those in charge here amid lessons learned from Dallas no doubt.  The coverage will continue with big precautions no doubt put in place and HazMat costumes a Halloween rage (so not creative).

Elsewhere:

  • The markets continued a volatile path with the broader indexes boasting their biggest weekly gains in more than a year, and the Dow up 2.6 percent on the week to end at 16,805;
  • Apple posted record year-end results and Microsoft revenue increased as Amazon recorded steep losses and saw its stock tumble;
  • Normally peaceful Ottawa witnessed a gunman kill a Canadian soldier;
  • Consumer giant P&G announced senior-management changes in a bid for a more focused company and amid talk on CEO succession plans;
  • Washington Post Editor and “Watergate Warrior” (NYT) Ben Bradlee died, called in memorials the last of “lion-king” newspaper editors;
  • The Sunday New York Post columnist Terry Keenan died, a pioneering financial journalist who was the first to report live from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for CNN; and
  • And outside of media circles but a media celebrity himself, Oscar de la Renta, fashion luminary, died. End of Story
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Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

Ebola news and misinformation about the disease dominated coverage at the end of the week amid reports on the first death in the US and the first case that was actually contracted here by a health-care worker who treated the victim in Dallas while in full protective gear.  The Texas hospital and health officials seemed to control the message—along with countless “experts”—with seemingly and surprisingly little commentary from the CDC.

Elsewhere:

  • The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Kailash Satyarthi, Indian children’s rights advocate, and Malala Yousafzai, outspoken schoolgirl in Pakistan who was shot in the head by the Taliban;
  • The Dow fell some 2.7 percent for the week, erasing all its gains made in 2014, to end at 16,544, dragged down in large part by concerns about overseas economic growth
  • Twitter sues the U.S. to make government data requests public, claiming violations of the First Amendment;
  • Michael Bloomberg is knighted for his “prodigious entrepreneurial and philanthropic endeavors” in the UK; and
  • The U.S. Supreme Court let stand lower-court rulings last week on bans against gay marriage in five states, effectively expanding the rights for unions to 24 states. End of Story
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Media Navel Gaze The Week Unpeeled

Although the controversy at the NFL continued to hold the media’s attention stage most of the week, financial news shifted its focus late to the Alibaba Group stock listing, with the Chinese e-commerce company pricing at $68 per share, and surging some 38 percent, making it the largest IPO in the US, raising at least $21.8 billion with a market value of $231 billion, and as The Wall Street Journal noted, larger than Procter & Gamble.

Elsewhere:

  • Oracle founder Larry Ellison stepped down as CEO, the tech behemoth’s only chief since it was launched in 1977;
  • The Scots voted to stay in the UK following a closely watched and heated campaign and British Prime Minister David Cameron quickly announced a surprise proposal that will give more powers to Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England;
  • The Royal and Ancient Golf Club voted to admit females, reversing a 260- year-old policy;
  • NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced a new conduct committee at a press conference last week amid the second week of the domestic-violence scandal that has hit the league; The Baltimore Ravens organized a Ray Rice jersey exchange, while Nike terminated its endorsement deal with NFL star Adrian Peterson but no word on the company’s NFL partnerships;
  • The Dow Jones recorded another new high, ending the week 1.7 percent higher to close at 17,279 based in part of comments from Fed Chief Janet Yellen that rates will stay low; and
  • Vogue has made it official, announcing we have made it to the “Era of the Booty,” which only means the editors missed out on the Sir Mix-a-Lot era who went there a long time ago. End of Story
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