Posts Tagged ‘Media Navel Gaze’

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

The World Cup seemed to dominate the news all week and even stopped business for a while when the US played Germany on Thursday, with Germany winning and the US advancing; no doubt the most headlines belonged to Luis Suarez from Uruguay who was eventually tossed from the remaining games for biting Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini, leaving quite mark on the games.

Elsewhere:

  • The 100-year anniversary of World War I also led coverage last week, particularly over the weekend, illustrating the vast geopolitical impact “The Great War” had on Europe;
  • American Apparel ousted chief Dov Charney managed to stay in the spotlight, fighting for his job and brand amid financial and
  • setbacks;
  • The Supreme Court ruled that Aereo violated programming copyrights, in effect shutting down the new-media start up that made it cheaper to watch broadcast network television;
  • In the UK, jurors acquitted Rebekah Brooks of the Murdoch empire on charges of phone hacking and bribery, among other allegations, but found Andy Coulson guilty of illegally intercepting voice-mail messages in the World of the News case;
  • The Court also ruled last week that police must obtain a warrant to search a cellphone for information, protecting privacy rights in America;
  • The US economy contracted in the first quarter by 2.9 percent, although stocks and other closely watched financial markets seemed to continued to show strength; economists remained upbeat about the economy despite the quarterly slip in growth; and
  • The Dow ended the week little changed, closing at 16,851;
  • ABC News is making changes with Diane Sawyer stepping down as anchor of the evening news, replaced by David Muir, while George Stephanopoulos will become lead anchor for all breaking news coverage.
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Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

No single news story seemed to dominate last week until late when Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was released by the Taliban in exchange for five Guantanamo detainees, making commentary and explanations the headlines of the weekend on a host of questions including details on the swap.

Elsewhere: 

  • The US economy shrank at a 1 percent annual rate last quarter (amid talk of a rebound);
  • Apple officially bought Beats;
  • Former Microsoft Chief Steve Ballmer is buying the LA Clippers for $2 billion;
  • Stocks continued their steady march to new highs with the Dow on Friday hitting a record of 16,717;
  • White House Press Secretary Jay Carney resigned after 3 ½ years in the job and will be replaced by his deputy Josh Earnest (perfect name for a spokesperson, right?);
  • The online privacy ruling in Europe gained media traction with Google putting together a framework on how to deal with the issue where individuals can request links removed that may violate their privacy;
  • NBC’s Brian Williams interviewed Edward Snowden with seemingly little fanfare really and an opening review line that spoke volumes in The New York Times: “I miss Barbara Walters already” and
  • Maya Angelou died amid countless poignant tributes including reminders of what is one of her famous quotes and my favorite: “I’ve learned you can tell a lot about a person about how (s)he handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage and tangled Christmas tree lights.” End of Story
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Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

The US employment picture on the surface seemed to brighten, with the April payroll number exceeding expectations and adding some 288,000 and prior months revised upward for a pretty fast clip this recovery.  The overall jobless rate declined to 6.3 percent.  However, analysts were quick to analyze that the participation rate was troubling, showing that workers were leaving the labor force and wages remained weak, highlighting income divides.

Elsewhere:

  • Merger Mania: Pfizer and AstraZeneca continued talks about a merger, while GE’s bid for Alstom, the French power company, was accepted;
  • The Texas utility Energy Futures filed for bankruptcy, the PE world’s largest buyout ever;
  • The Dow briefly hit a record last week and finished up 0.9 percent to close Friday at 16,512;
  • Ackman and Icahn apparently make up on phone huddle;
  • Fast Company won Magazine of the Year award, the industry’s top award from the American Society of Magazine Editors, while The New Yorker led overall with four individual awards;
  • PR Newswire is recommending that releases issued at close cross the wire at 4:01 after market trading in an apparent bid to keep data from high-frequency traders;
  • Yahoo plans to offer two comedy series on the Web;
  • The NBA banned LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life following alleged racist comments; bidders lining up for the team;
  • California Chrome wins the Derby; and
  • Jack Bauer returns! End of Story

 

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Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

The Pulitzers were announced last week with a real mix of winners for journalism, with Reuters winning for international reporting, The Washington Post for exploratory journalism, the Center for Public Integrity for investigative reporting and The Guardian US and WaPo for public service for their reporting on the classified documents leaked by Edward Snowden, no surprise really especially if you followed how that story unfolded and its aftermath but an award that nonetheless did receive some conservative-leaning criticism that a prize would go to coverage of a traitor.  Interesting, no award awarded for feature writing, a kinda unusual outcome.

Elsewhere:

  • The awards makes it even more interesting to note an obit in The New York Times over the weekend for Adrianna Wadewitz, who deservedly received the profile because of her contributions as a Wikipedia editor (and academic) and who made some 49,000 edits mostly to literature entries and was able to use her scholarly research/background to gain prominence through a new-media channel;
  • Stocks rose broadly during the holiday-shortened week, boosted by corporate earnings, with the Dow ending at 16,406;
  • Lots of tough talk and big headlines about the Ukraine but it seemed like Cold War scenarios were cooling;
  • TIAA-Cref agrees to buy Nuveen for $6.25 billion
  • Among the mountain of superlatives, an avalanche killed 12 Sherpas, the worst single-day tragedy;
  • Google buys a drone maker
  • Veep Biden takes a selfie (way to make it InstaGramp)
  • Michael Phelps gets back in the pool; and
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez of beautiful magical realism died. End of Story
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Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

The Heartbleed bug grabbed headlines and seemed to cause near panic among some Internet experts especially amid word on Friday that the NSA knew about the “hole” but kept mum to gather info; Changing passwords was in vogue late in the week.

Elsewhere:

  • Bill Gross of Pimco kept the El-Elrian departure story alive by saying on Bloomberg TV, “Come one, Mohamed, tell us why”; no direct answer why though;
  • Tech stocks tumbled pretty hard last week and brought down the overall market, with the Dow sliding 2.4 percent to end Friday at 16,026; bulls seem to be hiding;
  • The Feds raised the amount of money banks must hold in reserve against its assets at 5 percent from 3 percent, which means the biggies must keep as much as an additional $68 billion or perhaps cut back some risky activities;
  • Meanwhile, bank profits were mixed with Wells Fargo up 14 percent (consumer lending strength) while JP Morgan, the largest measured by assets, dropped 19 percent; and
  • Stephen Colbert of Comedy Central “Colbert Report” fame will host “Late Show” post David Letterman’s departure. End of Story
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