Posts Tagged ‘Mexico’


Noteworthy events for the month ahead . . .

July4thItaly takes over the rotating EU presidency from Greece on July 1. More details on Italy’s priorities here.

The U.S. celebrates its 238th year of independence on July 4 and 155 million hot dogs are expected to be consumed on this day according to National Hot Dog and Sausage Council. Perhaps this is why July is also National Hot Dog Month.

The FIFA World Cup wraps up on July 13. Did you know that South American and European countries have won the World Cup 9 times and 10 times respectively? There has been no other continent which has produced a World Cup Champion. Other major sport events to watch in July and August include the Tour De France (July 5), the golf British Open (July 17), and the tennis US Open (Aug. 25).

President Barack Obama celebrates his 53rd birthday on August 4. Also celebrating a birthday this month is Prosek’s fearless leader, Jennifer Prosek. Happy birthday, Jen!

Want to learn more about Mexico and how “US companies can best leverage the $507 billion import-export market with Mexico?” The Economist hosts a free webinar on this topic on August 5.

Other important, if not quirky, events to take place in the months of July and August include International Joke Day (July a), World Population Day (July 11), National Tequila Day (July 24), National Cheesecake Day (July 30), Friendship Day (August 3), International Left Handers Day (August 13), Womens Equality Day (August 26), and International Bacon Day (August 30). End of Story


Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

The Week Unpeeled

The big headlines in the business press continued to focus on bearish news on the European economy (and surprisingly not a whole lot on Walmart/Mexico) with the UK dipping back into recession and Spain posting a jobless rate of 25%, an 18-year high. In the US, a slowdown in growth (GDP rose only by an annualized 2.2 percent) in the first quarter but stocks nonetheless managed its biggest weekly advance in a month, the Dow rising 23 points Friday to end at 13,228 (Amazon results helped). No wonder that Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” is going on the block this week, expected to fetch as much as $80 million.

Elsewhere:

  • The Fed said it will keep short-term rates near zero until late 2014;
  • The US filed its first criminal charges tied to the BP oil spill, two years after the accident;
  • Apple’s quarterly profit nearly doubled, with iPhone shipments up 88 percent, thanks in part of China;
  • Sentiment in the UK has dropped following figures released this week that show that the UK is double-dipping down after a 0.2% contraction in the economy in the first quarter of the year;
  • Spain received more bad news with a credit downgrade from Standard and Poor's, and retail sales slumped for the 21st consecutive month;
  • Papers were dominated by Rupert Murdoch’s admission to the Leveson inquiry that there was a “cover up” at the News of the World and that he wished he closed the paper “years before.” He insisted he knew nothing about the scale of the phone-hacking until late 2010 and admitted it was a “serious blot on my reputation”; and
  • Cabinet minister Jeremy Hunt, under pressure this week for his dealings with Murdoch’s media empire, said he will hand over text messages and e-mails relating to his role in a failed bid by Mr. Murdoch to take full control of BSkyB, the UK’s main satellite broadcaster. CJP

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Credit: David Rochkind/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Anyone who read The New York Times investigative piece this weekend about Walmart probably had the same reaction I did.  First, this is what real journalism is all about. Wow! The Times cracked open a story — dating back to 2005 – about bribery and payoffs that may have been the reason for Walmart’s successful expansion into Mexico.  According to The Times, Walmart acted on the bribery information by swiftly conducting its own investigation – then just as swiftly moved to conceal it from U.S. and Mexican authorities.  Ouch!

It will be interesting to see how Walmart reacts over time.  For now, the company’s reaction (through its spokesman, David Tovar) is pretty standard: "If these allegations are true, it is not a reflection of who we are or what we stand for. We are deeply concerned by these allegations and are working aggressively to determine what happened.”  I will be watching closely to see how the story develops and how Walmart struggles to manage its reputation. For any one of my PR and crisis communications colleagues out there, I would be interested in your thoughts and reactions as this beast of a story unfolds. CJP


Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Maria de Lourdes “Lulu” SobrinoThis morning, I gave a presentation to 700 women entrepreneurs at Oklahoma State’s Spears School of Business’ “Women Inspire” conference. It was a thrill.  But perhaps the highlight of the experience was listening to the speaker before me.  Her name was Maria de Lourdes “Lulu” Sobrino and she is the founder of Lulu’s Dessert.  Born and raised in Mexico City, her first U.S. business, a travel agency, shut down due to economic conditions, so she began to explore new ideas.

As a Mexican American she was frustrated that she was unable to enjoy the gelatin deserts of her homeland in the states and so created the idea of a ready-to-eat gelatin desert for the U.S. market.  She recognized a need, filled it and revolutionized the food industry, creating the first ever ready-to-eat gelatin category, based on her mother’s recipe.  This was well before Jell-O made the category mainstream.  Now she sells through more than 2300 Wal-Mart stores and is among the top 500 Hispanic businesses in the United States.  And, she did all of this having no family in the United States, no network and very little savings. Her husband didn’t even support the idea.

Read the rest of this entry »


Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print