Posts Tagged ‘Microsoft’

Google_Transprency

In a fabulously ironic article on Friday, July 18, The Wall Street Journal spotlighted a Netherlands-based PE investor who took advantage of the European Union Court of Justice’s recent ruling that individuals can now request that Google remove irrelevant links from searches of their name. The WSJ apparently received a notification from Google that an article had been removed from a number of European search results. (And yes, the article cited the investor’s original article of contention in this new, now undoubtedly highly-cited piece.)

Since the May ruling, Google has received over 70,000 takedown requests for the removal 250,000 webpages from search results, according to the company’s official blog. Amid the process of removing links, Google has begun sending websites notifications of articles which no longer appear in search results — sparking an initial backlash from journalists who are seeing their stories fall off of Google’s radar.

The ruling has also ignited a long, arguably subjective process for Google. In an initial response to the decision, a spokesperson noted: “The court’s ruling requires Google to make difficult judgments about an individual’s right to be forgotten and the public’s right to know.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

No single news story seemed to dominate last week until late when Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was released by the Taliban in exchange for five Guantanamo detainees, making commentary and explanations the headlines of the weekend on a host of questions including details on the swap.

Elsewhere: 

  • The US economy shrank at a 1 percent annual rate last quarter (amid talk of a rebound);
  • Apple officially bought Beats;
  • Former Microsoft Chief Steve Ballmer is buying the LA Clippers for $2 billion;
  • Stocks continued their steady march to new highs with the Dow on Friday hitting a record of 16,717;
  • White House Press Secretary Jay Carney resigned after 3 ½ years in the job and will be replaced by his deputy Josh Earnest (perfect name for a spokesperson, right?);
  • The online privacy ruling in Europe gained media traction with Google putting together a framework on how to deal with the issue where individuals can request links removed that may violate their privacy;
  • NBC’s Brian Williams interviewed Edward Snowden with seemingly little fanfare really and an opening review line that spoke volumes in The New York Times: “I miss Barbara Walters already” and
  • Maya Angelou died amid countless poignant tributes including reminders of what is one of her famous quotes and my favorite: “I’ve learned you can tell a lot about a person about how (s)he handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage and tangled Christmas tree lights.” End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

Games on in Sochi, which stole much of the media spotlight over the weekend  but for the markets, the jobs report in the US did not shine any real positive light on the economy last week with a slowdown in hiring pretty evident. Non-farm payroll only advanced by a mere 113,000, still above December levels but not strong enough to be considered a sustained recovery.  The unemployment rate did tick down to 6.6 percent in January from 6.7 percent for those looking for somewhat good news.  The markets, however, looked elsewhere for guidance and staged a late-week rally, with the Dow rallying on Friday to close stronger but the blue chip barometer is still down 4.7 percent for the year.

Elsewhere:

  • Media and pundits continued to speculate that the Fed will likely continue to taper, no matter jobs numbers;
  • Beatle fans staged a more muted hysteria over the last few days in America than 50 years ago in celebration of the Fab Four’s US television debut on the Ed Sullivan show;
  • Former SAC portfolio manager Matthew Martoma, was charged with insider trading,  now bringing to eight the number of convictions for the hedge fund;
  • CVS has decided to quit the habit of selling cigarettes, no doubt a business more than a health decision but significant nonetheless;
  • Facebook launched its Paper app to bring “newspaper” style content to your device and continuing to show that technology is the driving force in media;
  • Microsoft officially announced insider Satya Nadella as the next CEO;
  • Jay Leno say another goodbye as host of the “Tonight” show, paving the way of Jimmy Fallon to take over the coveted late-night spot; and
  • Musical group Pussy Riot says nyet to Sochi and takes the US by Polar Vortex End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

The Syria debate continued in the headlines with what appears to be growing concern in the US and abroad on whether to support airstrikes.  The efforts by President Obama on the Hill and at the G20 summit in Russia to find support dominated broadcasts and print throughout the weekend, overshadowing a tricky US unemployment report.  Called a “witches’ brew” of nerve gas by The New York Times, Syria has amassed “one of the world’s largest stockpiles of chemical weapons, an assessment that will continue to fuel the debate.

Elsewhere:

  • The US jobless rate fell to 7.3 percent (because many are leaving the workforce after being idle for too long) in August and added a less-than-expected 169,000 workers to non-farm payrolls;
  • The employment report sparked decidedly different headlines with some showing the mixed message of the news: “Muddies Fed Plans” (WSJ) to “Not Expected to Deter Fed” (NYT); Stocks were equally confounded, it seems;
  • The Dow ended the week up only 0.8 percent but its first weekly advance in five to close at 14,922;
  • At the G20 summit, leaders declared the economy may worsen, saying the recovery has been too sluggish (“too weak,” to be exact);
  • Microsoft agreed to buy most of Nokia for $7 billion in an apparent bid to “hear them now”;
  • And on a much bigger scale, Verizon agreed to buy Vodafone’s 45 percent stake in Verizon wireless for $130 billion, one of the biggest deals ever;
  • Tokyo won the race to host the Summer Olympics in 2020;
  • Alec Baldwin will host (or “assault” said The New York Post) a talk show on MSNBC called “Up Late with Alec Baldwin”; and
  • Rupert Murdoch is the subject of a new play in his home country Australia called “Murdoch,” in a song-and-dance look behind the headlines. Hmmm. End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

Once again, the summer sizzle continued on the headline front (lots dealing with the media industry) with Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announcing his plans to step down next year in a move applauded by analysts that sent the stock rallying 7 percent.

Elsewhere:

  • The Nasdaq market suffered a big black eye when its trading system shut down for some three hours on Thursday because of a glitch;
  • In seemingly perfect timing, the electronic changes BATS Global Markets and Direct Edge announced intention to merge in a deal that will make it the second largest exchange, jumping ahead of Nasdaq;
  • The Dow ended the week down a slight 0.5 percent but its third straight weekly loss to end at 15, 010;
  • US appeals court ruled in favor of creditors to be paid in full on defaulted bonds out of Argentina, a win for hedge funds holding the debt but a battle that is surely not finished;
  • Hedge-fund manager Philip Falcone of Harbinger Capital Partners admitted wrongdoing in his settlement with the SEC, a harbinger itself as new SEC Chief White has said she will push for more admissions of guilt;
  • The media world and Washington and elsewhere honored the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, with tributes to Martin Luther King and his legacy;
  • Newt Gingrich is joining CNN as host of “Crossfire”;
  • NPR losses another chief as Gary Knell moves to National Geographic after just under two years in the role at the radio network;
  • Amid Bloomberg “spygate,” the news/data group will appoint a new independent editor/ombudsman, a recommendation that was part of an outside report;
  • Al Jazeera launched in the US amid lots of headlines and reportedly few advertisers in a bid to become a “hard-news-all-the-time” channel;
  • The “Today” show is taking a page from Oprah and starting a monthly book club, in apparent good news to publishers and readers alike; and
  • Finally, it’s official: Area 51 is real so we can blame everything on that. End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print