Posts Tagged ‘Mitt Romney’

QuoteAs someone who has been in and around the media for more than 20 years, I have a special appreciation (and affinity) for a good quote. You know the ones—maybe it’s the perfect analogy, a witty metaphor or some well-chosen words laced with emotion. These are the quotes we look to uncover in Notes on Quotes. And with that . . . a look now at five recent, noteworthy quotes:

5. "I believe everybody deserves an Etch-A-Sketch opportunity and an opportunity to start a new chapter."

Is there any better metaphor for a redo than an Etch-A-Sketch? As you may recall, back in 2012  the phrase gained fame thanks to a foot-in-mouth comment from Mitt Romney’s senior campaign advisor – who basically admitted that he might be flip-flopping on some of his earlier political positions.  ("I think you hit a reset button for the fall campaign. Everything changes," the campaign manager said. "It's almost like an Etch-A-Sketch. You can kind of shake it up, and we start all over again.")

Now the metaphor is back – and in a much more uplifting way. Jonathan Martin was the offensive guard who quit the Miami Dolphins this past season after allegedly being bullied by his teammates. He is once again in the league thanks to his former college coach at Stanford, Jim Harbaugh, who coaches the 49ers. "I believe everybody deserves an Etch-A-Sketch opportunity and an opportunity to start a new chapter," he said. Harbaugh and the NFL are both hoping this time the Etch-A-Sketch produces a much prettier picture.

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The Week Unpeeled

Presidential campaign pollsters were busy all week with Republican candidate Mitt Romney by most media accounts gaining the upper hand in the first debate on Wednesday and the jobs numbers Friday showing “headline” strength (September jobless rate fell below 8.0 percent to 7.8 percent (the lowest point under President Obama) from 8.1 percent.  Jobs grew in the month by 114,000 and prior months totals were revised slightly higher.  In short: analysis was right direction not strong enough.

Elsewhere:

  • Turkey returned fire and attacked targets inside Syria last week, raising concerns about ongoing conflict with new heat in the region;
  • Facebook reached 1 billion active users, doubling membership since just July 2012;
  • BAE and EADS merger was reportedly close to collapsing as states remained deadlocked over state ownership stakes and the location of the combined company's headquarters;
  • The London market finished the week on a high after a drop in the US unemployment rate boosted investor confidence, while the Dow rose 1.3 percent for the week to end near a five-year high at 13,610;
  • Figures released by Visa Europe revealed UK consumer spending rose month-on-month by 3pc in September 2012, showing consumers are returning to the shops
  • The biggest change to British pension schemes for more than 100 years started on Tuesday; 9m people were automatically signed up for workplace schemes; and

The weekend saw tributes to Apple’s Steve Jobs, who died one year ago Friday. End of Story

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The Week Unpeeled

All political eyes in the US will be focused on the first of three presidential debates, starting Wednesday, with President Obama currently leading in three key states putting added pressure on Mitt Romney in what columnist Peggy Noonan in The Wall Street Journal over the weekend called a “hinge point in history,” especially for the Republican candidate.

Elsewhere:

  • The Financial Services Authority announced an overhaul of the Libor interbank lending rate in an attempt to restore faith in the benchmark, which included the current governing body (British Bankers’ Association) giving up responsibility for what the Financial Times called the “broken” Libor;
  • Spain and Greece outlined plans to reduce government spending and raise taxes to convince international lenders and financial markets they are on track to cut their deficits;
  • The Dow ended September 2.6 percent higher and the quarter 4.3 percent higher to close Friday at 13,437, with Spain credit ratings weighing on the market despite the positive performance;
  • Blackberry maker Research In Motion’s share price jumped nearly 18% after the company posted a smaller-than-expected quarterly loss of $235 million;
  • Apple was forced to apologize over the fiasco surrounding its maps;
  • The Huffington Post launched its Italian-language Web site, which featured an interview with Silvio Berlusconi, the former prime minister of Italy, who insisted that talk on his private life was “disinformation and defamation”; this marks the fifth version of the Web site with others besides the US in Canada, the UK, France and Spain;
  • Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, the publisher of The New York Times for over 30 years, died; and
  • Researchers revealed they are close to creating an anti-aging pill after identifying a protein responsible for the decline in muscle repair during aging. End of Story
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The Week Unpeeled

Campaign news continued to take hold of the headlines with Republican candidate Mitt Romney finally releasing tax returns (20 years of them), with his effective tax rate for 2011 at 14.1 percent, a level actually higher than he was legally required to pay because of how he accounted for charitable contributions.  Opponents will not be charitable, however, in the 2011 level.

Elsewhere:

  • The Dow ended lower for the week (but just down 0.1 percent although its first decline for the month) to close Friday at 13,579;
  • Sotheby’s will become the first foreign firm to sell art in China, besting rival Christie’s;
  • The BAE/EADs merger deal seemed to move closer to reality with UK PM David Cameron blessing the deal as a win for the UK economy;
  • The fallout from the anti-Muslim film refused to abate as further protests broke out and Western embassies continued to come under siege;
  • Rupert Murdoch scored a victory with UK regulators concluding that his BSkyb was “fit and proper” for a broadcast license following controversy surrounding News Corp.’s phone-hacking scandal;
  • UK government borrowing rose to record highs in August as official figures showed the deficit for the first five months of the financial year were running at more than 25pc above target;
  • Debate and controversy surrounding the publication of the topless photos of the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton continued after it emerged that more than 200 pictures were taken of her. The photographer who took the pictures is now in hiding as the Royal Family have asked French prosecutors to bring criminal charges against her; and
  • Apple’s launch of the latest model of the iPhone was marred by criticism around the new maps app, which has been described as “dangerously misleading.” End of Story
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The Week Unpeeled

The Democratic convention ended last week and now the serious gloves-off campaigning begins.  Needless to say, gobs of ink and e-ink spilled on coverage and analysis but some interesting social-media analysis surfaced toward the end of the week on the campaign (not just the conventions), especially in Charles M. Blow’s column in The New York Times on Saturday, titled “The Engagement Gap” or the media engagement (social media, that is) gap. For example, the Obama campaign posted nearly “four times as much content as the Romney campaign and was active on nearly twice as many platforms,” according to a study from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, referenced in his column and probably not too surprising.  Obama easily outscored Romney on retweets, YouTube views, likes, and the likes. Also, the President’s speech last week set a record for political moments on Twitter. Hashtag that! And in the old-school TV medium, one kinda embarrassing statistic (for the Republican camp and America), according to The Hollywood Reporter: The Republican convention on Wednesday was “outperformed” on every station among the 18- to 49-year market by the TLC show, “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo.”  Almost makes you miss the Kardashians.

Also, worth noting (for us pitching and for us educating clients and how we can leverage an interview) was a rundown of a day in the life of a reporter at the convention and how much their work has changed, observed by Thomas L. Friedman in his Sunday column in The New York Times: report, file for the Web edition, file for the International Herald Tribune, tweet, update for the Web edition, report more, track other people’s tweets, do a Web-video spot and then write the story for the print paper.  An NYT grand slam would be one interview in all channels, right?

Elsewhere:

  • The US jobless rate declined to 8.1 in August from 8.3 in July, mostly because the unemployed got tired of looking for jobs in a sluggish report overall and a big boo boo for the Obama campaign;
  • The Dow ended the week 1.6 percent higher to close at 13,306 on Friday amid talks of plans for eurozone bond buying;
  • Cosmopolitan of Hearst Magazines named Joanna Coles from Marie Claire as its new editor;
  • Apple announced plans for a Web-radio platform a la Pandora;
  • Also, this week saw the launch of new Smartphones from Nokia, Motorola and Amazon;
  • Figures from the British Retail Consortium highlighted the economic impact of the Olympic Games was not as strong as expected. Sales in some stores in August were down by 0.4 percent on the same period last year;
  • The Bank of England  decided to keep interest rates unchanged at 0.5 percent and not to implement additional quantitative easing; and
  • In another bad week for job losses, Insurance giant Direct Line confirmed that nearly 900 jobs are being axed and Nomura announced a retreat from London with an expected 400 jobs likely to go. End of Story
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