Posts Tagged ‘Nicole Bliman’

The Olympics are out and election season is in full swing.  Mitt Romney announced that Paul Ryan will be his running mate on the Republican ticket just as London's Closing Ceremonies were set to take place and as the announcement came, cable news networks rejoiced.

Election season can be a hard pill to swallow. The ads can be ludicrous, the pundits barely come up for air, the volley of statistics and accusations is endless. . . it’s just exhausting.

I know it’s important to pay attention, but to what or whom should we be listening to? The messages are so convoluted, even an honest attempt at genuine journalism is confusing.

Campaign strategists for each candidate do not have an easy job these next three months – how are they supposed to effectively communicate their candidate’s platform among such a tidal wave of messaging?

If you could offer a PR tip to either candidate this election season, what would it be? It is a public relations challenge in need of some Olympian strength.  End of Story

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For anyone not familiar with the New York City apartment-rental scene. . . I assure you it is a beast like no other.  If you’re looking for an apartment for August 1, you do not begin your search until mid-June. And even then, many brokers will tell you to contact them again on July 1 when they will have a better idea of what’s available for August.  But that’s not even the fun part... when you find the place you think you want to call home, you have less than 24 hours to make up your mind. Sleep does not come easily in those 24 hours.  I speak from recent experience. . . which is hopefully ending soon with an application and credit check currently underway.

Just as I had to snap up my soon-to-be-new apartment before someone else took it (it’s priced well under market value and the broker had several people lined up to see it); so too must PR pros and their clients act fast when opportunity comes knocking.  Decisions have to be made quickly; which is why knowing what you want and understanding the landscape are critical to establish from the beginning.

You have to know what you’re looking for.  I had a location, price range and a few other factors on my “wish list” to share with brokers at the start of the search, so when I found the apartment I wanted, I was easily able to tick-off all the things on my list – nearly all, at any rate – there is no such thing as a perfect apartment. A PR team and its client need to establish what is on everyone’s wish list at the start of engagement; what are our ultimate goals? What media outlets do we want to be in? Do we want to offer third party commentary or focus on profile pieces and bylined articles?  With these things decided at the onset, it is always much easier to snap up the best opportunities and leave the mediocre ones behind.

You also have to be patient—stick to your goals, stick to your wish-list. It's important to act fast, but also to act right and in the best interest of your client. Don’t arrange an interview that won’t help achieve the account goals; it will be a waste of everyone’s time.  Of course it may be tempting to say, “Let’s just do this already!” but when that winning opportunity—or apartment—comes through, it will make for a much happier home. CJP

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Last week, I had the pleasure of listening to two of the most influential gatekeepers in business media (both of The Wall Street Journal): Dennis Berman, Marketplace editor and Francesco Guerrera, Money & Investing editor.  Dennis and Francesco were invited to speak as part of a monthly “Meet the Editors” series hosted by Gorkana.

Berman feels PR pros have become “too passive” in their pitching

During the session, the two discussed several topics some of which included how 50% of their time is devoted to deciding what goes on the website, how their reporters are expected to be working on feature articles and next-day articles simultaneously and how they generally resist accepting embargoed stories.

But what I found most interesting was when the conversation turned to the relationship between PR professionals and journalists. Dennis said he feels PR pros have become “too passive” in their pitching and need to do a better job of showing him we really care about the pitch. Sending an email and occasionally following up with a phone call is “lame” in his view. “Is that the best you can do?” he asked the audience of PR practitioners. He said that “sometimes it feels that we’ve lost the will and urge to advocate for our clients.”

Guerrera: "You'll know" when you're calling too much.

This was not the guidance I was expecting at all. In countless blog posts, I’ve read about how annoying PR people can be and how some journalists are begging us (or threatening us) to stop contacting them. Was Dennis asking us to call him more? That couldn’t be right, so I had to ask…where’s the line between pitching what we genuinely feel is a relevant source or story and becoming a nuisance?

Dennis and Francesco each gave two word answers respectively: “Three calls.” and “You’ll know.”

This got a hearty chuckle from the crowd before Dennis elaborated briefly – it’s a judgment call, of course. But don’t give up too easily, either. Don’t take their first “no” and walk away. Talk about it some more, try to find out what it is about the pitch that they don’t love and find a way to make it better. Fight for your pitch. And sometimes, know when to move on to the next one. CJP

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Google's Response to SOPA and PIPAWelcome to today's hot topics: SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) and PIPA (Protect IP Act). Is anyone REALLY for it? Sure, I can defend aspects of it. I'm sure anyone can. Shouldn't a company who produces music be allowed to regulate how it's used online? Of course... but how much is too much regulation, and when does big brother get too much of a watchful eye? Frankly, the very concept of corporations being able to control what I think and say online thoroughly irritates me, and cynically I know that some disgruntled punk somewhere will make it his life's prerogative to make sure I never quote their lyrics and reference their music. Ugh, I could editorialize, but I'd just be ranting, so yeah, let's move on to the REAL main event here:

Wikipedia and other websites pulled their virtual plugs on Wednesday, January 18th in protest of SOPA and PIPA. Will their collective voices be heard, or are SOPA and PIPA necessary legislations?

Are you still unclear about what SOPA and PIPA are and how they work? Check out our previous educational post on the subject.

Ready, set and read!

"Although I certainly see the danger in piracy online, the web has always been free from over regulation (quite honestly, it’s probably the main reason why it’s grown at all).  As it relates to SOPA and PIPA, I definitely don’t support any of these provisions as they currently exist—they encourage online censorship, create cyber security risks, and possibly allow for the destruction of start-ups by big corporations/organizations.

If things like this get passed, say goodbye to Internet publishing (as it is now), and say hello to tons of allegations of 'infringed content,' a lack of due process and blacklists.

If you haven’t gathered, I’m glad to see that this is causing a commotion online. It should. And hopefully it won’t be the last protest." ~Bea (beabroderick)

Read the rest of this entry »

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