Posts Tagged ‘Reuters’

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

The Pulitzers were announced last week with a real mix of winners for journalism, with Reuters winning for international reporting, The Washington Post for exploratory journalism, the Center for Public Integrity for investigative reporting and The Guardian US and WaPo for public service for their reporting on the classified documents leaked by Edward Snowden, no surprise really especially if you followed how that story unfolded and its aftermath but an award that nonetheless did receive some conservative-leaning criticism that a prize would go to coverage of a traitor.  Interesting, no award awarded for feature writing, a kinda unusual outcome.

Elsewhere:

  • The awards makes it even more interesting to note an obit in The New York Times over the weekend for Adrianna Wadewitz, who deservedly received the profile because of her contributions as a Wikipedia editor (and academic) and who made some 49,000 edits mostly to literature entries and was able to use her scholarly research/background to gain prominence through a new-media channel;
  • Stocks rose broadly during the holiday-shortened week, boosted by corporate earnings, with the Dow ending at 16,406;
  • Lots of tough talk and big headlines about the Ukraine but it seemed like Cold War scenarios were cooling;
  • TIAA-Cref agrees to buy Nuveen for $6.25 billion
  • Among the mountain of superlatives, an avalanche killed 12 Sherpas, the worst single-day tragedy;
  • Google buys a drone maker
  • Veep Biden takes a selfie (way to make it InstaGramp)
  • Michael Phelps gets back in the pool; and
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez of beautiful magical realism died. End of Story
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Associated Press style, which is used by news organizations across the county, is what we follow at Prosek Partners. We don’t use Oxford commas; we write 4:30 p.m. instead of 4:30 PM; and we’ll write Mr. Edwards’ to designate possession when we know that really it should be Mr. Edwards’s because Edwards is singular.  AP style strives for as clean and simple a look as possible.

There are, however, a few places where the AP does not weigh in.  In the public relations field, we find ourselves writing publication names many times a day. Some days I probably write The Wall Street Journal more times than I write my own name. The question of whether or not publication names like The Wall Street Journal should be italicized is not as straightforward as some might think. We’ve all heard that italics are the proper way to designate a publication that runs in print. But the AP stylebook doesn’t say this. In fact, in over 300 pages of text, the AP style book does not address the issue directly at all. So what’s a PR professional to do? At Prosek, we tend to err on the side of formality and italicize publication names in all our documents, but is this the right decision?

In the evolving world of media, differentiating between a print publication and an online publication seems a bit outdated. The online version of The Wall Street Journal gets about 8 million readers to the print edition’s 1 million. Many of the best-read news outlets don’t even have print editions. Others, like SmartMoney, have announced that their print editions will cease to print at all.

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The Week Unpeeled

Wall Street may have been “occupied” by protestors, but the markets were otherwise pre-occupied with ongoing and somewhat deeper concerns about the economic outlook for the US and Europe last week, with stocks ending the third quarter as the weakest since the financial crisis.  The Dow lost 240 points on Friday to close at 10,913, or down 12 percent for the quarter.  Elsewhere:

  • CBS’s “60 Minutes” lost Andy Rooney —92 years old!—who has played the curmudgeon on the news program for more than three decades or 120 quarters;
  • Tumblr raised $85 million in venture capital in a move that valued the blogging service at $800 million;
  • Warren Buffett, in a move he has been known to criticize, bought back tens of billions of dollars of his company’s stock, highlighting the amount of cash on the sidelines at big companies like Berkshire Hathaway;
  • Reebok got kicked in the butt that it is trying to tone and was told to pay customers $25 million for false claims that its EasyTone shoes are no better than maybe even flipflops;
  • Tainted melons from Colorado were linked to at least 15 deaths and many more illnesses in one of the deadliest food-borne outbreaks in a decade;
  • One of the US’s most-wanted Al Qaeda terrorists was killed in Yemen in a CIA drone attack;
  • Chelsea Clinton joined the IAC board;
  • Former US State Department Assistant Secretary James Rubin left Bloomberg View in a kinda surprise move; and
  • Amazon discovered Fire.

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The Week Unpeeled (with dispatches from Sydney, today’s MNG dateline)

Davos last week convened with even less fanfare than last year (CEOs seemed more optimistic, however), with much of the news focus on domestic issues after President Obama delivered his State of the Union address to more-than-usual anticipation in front of a new Congress and a slight rise in popularity. (Coverage of Obama’s speech hit the front pages in Australia, with The Australian pronouncing, “Obama tells US to ‘win the future’,” in a speech that has been characterized here (and no doubt everywhere) as the launch of his re-election campaign. Elsewhere in Australia and around the globe:

  • Unrest in Egypt (backed by the Muslim Brotherhood) dominated coverage as it threatened the 30-year rule of President Hosni Mubarek;
  • The unrest in Egypt and Tunisia, fanned in large part by social-network rallying cries, led many to speculate whether other nations in the Middle East were next to erupt;
  • Egypt reportedly disrupted mobile phone services and Internet access was interrupted; and
  • Markets were rattled with the Dow falling 166 points on Friday to end at 11,823.

Other Media-Related Aussie Observations

The broadsheets are literally broadsheets with dailies printed in large format:

  • iPads are everywhere and seem to be more popular than at home (or least more visible on the streets);
  • Oprah-mania still riding high after her TV special here, even though the talk-show format is not popular on Australian television;
  • Being 16 hours ahead means WSJ and Financial Times not readily available in print, with tabloid Financial Review most popular business newspaper;
  • Reuters is a big wire service here, even in the land of Rupert Murdoch (who owns Dow Jones);
  • Sports coverage and gossip is dominated by betting, where you can wager on any aspect of the Australian Open, like how many points will be played in the first set (even the Sidney Opera House funded by a lottery);
  • In business, mining, mining and more mining;
  • Women dominate politics from the prime minister down to local levels; and
  • Like everywhere, weather seems to be No. 1 news story, but weather here has been extremely extreme (floods and blistering temperatures). CJP
australia kangaroo
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