Posts Tagged ‘Syria’

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

Most of the business headlines were overshadowed by the Syria strategy flip flops until Twitter announced on, well, Twitter its plans to go public  -- full stop.  No details were forthcoming, using Jobs Act regulations that make disclosure unnecessary for companies under $1 billion in revenue and easy to tell all in 140 characters; Goldman won the IPO mandate and the news even made the full front page of The New York Post, showing media loves to cover media.

Elsewhere:

  • Tina Brown announced she was leaving The Daily Beast and publishing all together (at least for now) and focusing on a conference company based on her Woman in the World summits;
  • Bloomberg appointed executive editor Tim Quinson (an insider?) to be its standards editor, a new position put in place following the discovery that journalists were improperly accessing customer data;
  • Apple launched two new iPhones, one cheaper and in color and one fancier with fingerprint sensors;  investors did not bite;
  • In an apparent first, Bloomberg Businessweek  was behind a documentary on former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson called Hank, which debuted last week in time for the five-year anniversary of the financial crisis and will be available on Netflix;
  • Verizon offered a  whopping $49 billion in bonds last week for its acquisition of its wireless business amid whopping demand;
  • The Dow shape-shifted removing Hewlett-Packard, Bank of America and Alcoa and added Nike, Goldman Sachs and Visa; and
  • The blue-chip average soared 3 percent last week to end Friday at 15,376, the biggest gain since the first week of the year. End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Media Navel Gaze

The Week Unpeeled

The Syria debate continued in the headlines with what appears to be growing concern in the US and abroad on whether to support airstrikes.  The efforts by President Obama on the Hill and at the G20 summit in Russia to find support dominated broadcasts and print throughout the weekend, overshadowing a tricky US unemployment report.  Called a “witches’ brew” of nerve gas by The New York Times, Syria has amassed “one of the world’s largest stockpiles of chemical weapons, an assessment that will continue to fuel the debate.

Elsewhere:

  • The US jobless rate fell to 7.3 percent (because many are leaving the workforce after being idle for too long) in August and added a less-than-expected 169,000 workers to non-farm payrolls;
  • The employment report sparked decidedly different headlines with some showing the mixed message of the news: “Muddies Fed Plans” (WSJ) to “Not Expected to Deter Fed” (NYT); Stocks were equally confounded, it seems;
  • The Dow ended the week up only 0.8 percent but its first weekly advance in five to close at 14,922;
  • At the G20 summit, leaders declared the economy may worsen, saying the recovery has been too sluggish (“too weak,” to be exact);
  • Microsoft agreed to buy most of Nokia for $7 billion in an apparent bid to “hear them now”;
  • And on a much bigger scale, Verizon agreed to buy Vodafone’s 45 percent stake in Verizon wireless for $130 billion, one of the biggest deals ever;
  • Tokyo won the race to host the Summer Olympics in 2020;
  • Alec Baldwin will host (or “assault” said The New York Post) a talk show on MSNBC called “Up Late with Alec Baldwin”; and
  • Rupert Murdoch is the subject of a new play in his home country Australia called “Murdoch,” in a song-and-dance look behind the headlines. Hmmm. End of Story
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

The Week Unpeeled

Syria returned to the front pages with the Obama administration reportedly planning to arm rebels based on evidence that that Syria has used chemical weapons in the civil war.  The decision clearly comes with sharply divided opinions on level of commitment.

Elsewhere:

  • Protests in Istanbul flared up over the weekend in an intensifying showdown with the government;
  • Iran elected a moderate;
  • RBS Chief Stephen Hester was booted by board after three years at the mostly UK-owned bank; search on for replacement;
  • Gannett Corp is buying Belo TV, the largest local television deal in a decade and a sign of big bets on media diversification and the future of local news coverage;
  • Sarah Palin is returning to Fox News as a “paid contributor”;
  • Rupert Murdoch and third wife (who famously defended her husband in the phone hacking scandal) are splitting, a news item first reported by Deadline;
  • The Dow lost ground, sliding Friday to end down 1.17 percent for the week; Volatility has returned to the markets, especially in the US and Japan; and
  • Curious statement by a co-founder of Bloomberg LP, reportedly told to senior staffers at the news outfit and quoted in a New York Times story on Friday that “the only journalism that matters is the kind that moves markets”;  (Interested to know total context since no mention is made of truth, accuracy or greater good.) End of Story
zp8497586rq
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print
Comments Off Written on June 17th, 2013 by
Categories: From the News, Media Navel Gaze
Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Week Unpeeled

Government leaders, thought leaders and media scribes have been busy convening a lot lately with US presidents in Texas making an appearance for the opening of the George Bush library (with US media commenting how Hillary Clinton looked so presidential herself); the World Bank and IMF finishing its round of huddles (amid talk of less austerity more growth); White House correspondents red-carpeting annual dinner in Washington (boycotted by Tom Brokaw who says it’s more about celebrity than news, and President Obama saying he will be opening the Blame Bush Library soon), and the Milken Global Conference kicking off this week in Beverly Hills.

Elsewhere, less convening, more real headlines:

  • Boston marathon alleged bomber search found evidence of plans for a second attack in Times Square;
  • Washington is confronting allegations that Syria appears to have used chemical weapons, which Obama said would “change his calculus” but many seem unsure what that really means;
  • The AP Twitter account was hacked with a Tweet of White House terrorist attack, briefing sending markets sharply lower;
  • Koch brothers of libertarian bent made headlines in their exploratory bid for a group of newspapers that include The Chicago Tribune and The Los Angeles Times;
  • Apple increased its return of cash to shareholders by $55 billion to about $100 billion over three years;
  • The UK economy narrowly missed a third recessionary dip with slight signs of growth;
  • Nasdaq OMX is expected to pay $10 million to US regulators for botched Facebook listing (separately $62 million expected to go to brokers); and
  • The Dow ended the week slightly higher at 14,703. End of Story
zp8497586rq
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

The Week Unpeeled

Presidential campaign pollsters were busy all week with Republican candidate Mitt Romney by most media accounts gaining the upper hand in the first debate on Wednesday and the jobs numbers Friday showing “headline” strength (September jobless rate fell below 8.0 percent to 7.8 percent (the lowest point under President Obama) from 8.1 percent.  Jobs grew in the month by 114,000 and prior months totals were revised slightly higher.  In short: analysis was right direction not strong enough.

Elsewhere:

  • Turkey returned fire and attacked targets inside Syria last week, raising concerns about ongoing conflict with new heat in the region;
  • Facebook reached 1 billion active users, doubling membership since just July 2012;
  • BAE and EADS merger was reportedly close to collapsing as states remained deadlocked over state ownership stakes and the location of the combined company's headquarters;
  • The London market finished the week on a high after a drop in the US unemployment rate boosted investor confidence, while the Dow rose 1.3 percent for the week to end near a five-year high at 13,610;
  • Figures released by Visa Europe revealed UK consumer spending rose month-on-month by 3pc in September 2012, showing consumers are returning to the shops
  • The biggest change to British pension schemes for more than 100 years started on Tuesday; 9m people were automatically signed up for workplace schemes; and

The weekend saw tributes to Apple’s Steve Jobs, who died one year ago Friday. End of Story

zp8497586rq
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print