Posts Tagged ‘Walmart’

taxes_sdNoteworthy events for the month ahead . . .

The month kicks off with April Fools’ Day. Here is a look-back at the biggest pranks in 2013.

Panama plays host to the World Economic Forum on Latin America on April 1-3. The conference focuses on the region’s efforts in maintaining its economic growth, boosting the diversification of its economies, increase its productivity, fuel competitiveness, enhance trade and invest in human capital.

The Wall Street Journal’s ECO:nomics conference is on April 2-4 in Santa Barbara, CA. As always, the conference convenes experts from a diverse range of industries – oil, gas, alternative energy, clean tech, manufacturing, finance, and consumer businesses – to debunk myths and opportunities. This year’s speakers include chairmen and CEOs of Walmart, Tyson Foods, Statoil, Toyota, Waste Management, and more.

Something to look forward to on April 15 – a total lunar eclipse is visible to those in Australia, the Pacific, and the Americas. Speaking of April 15, don’t forget to file your taxes. Here are “10 Tips for Getting the Biggest Tax Refund.”

About 36,000 runners compete in the 118th Boston Marathon on April 21. Runners will commemorate those killed by the bombing at the 2013 race.

Celebrate Mother Earth on April 22. This year’s theme for Earth Day is Green Cities, which focuses on initiatives that help create sustainable communities. How will you do your part?

Rounding up the month, PRWeek hosts its PR Summit 2014 in London on April 29. A one-day strategic PR event, the focus of this year’s summit will be on the evolution of PR in the global and digital landscape.

Other important, if not quirky, events to take place in the month of April include National Walk to Work Day (April 4), World Pillow Fight Day (April 5), World Health Day (April 7), Passover (April 14), and Easter (April 19). End of Story

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

Noteworthy events for the month ahead . . .

thanksgiving-turkey

We’ll kick off November with Election Day on November 5. While it is an off-year election, there are several significant races worth paying attention to including the New York City mayoral election and New Jersey’s gubernatorial race.

Curious to know where’s next for economics, politics and business? The Economist to host its annual Global Agenda conference on November 7-8 in London where over 50 chief executives and chairmen of some of the world’s foremost companies, and leaders from politics and civil society will tackle this question.

Don’t forget to honor the men and women who have served in the armed service on November 11. The National Veterans Day Ceremony will take place at the Arlington National Cemetery. For more information on other events, visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Gorkana will host a couple of “connection” events in November. On November 12, connect with Cosmopolitan UK and US editors at the Hearst Tower in New York City. Then on November 21, connect with a panel of reporters from The Chicago Tribune in Chicago.

PRSA will continue its series of professional development courses throughout November. Highlight courses include “Best Practices for B2B Public Relations,” “Public Relations Strategic Planning,” and “The Digital PR Strategist’s Toolkit.”

This year’s Thanksgiving in the U.S. is on November 28, and an expected 280 million turkeys will be sold to celebrate this holiday. For ideas to spice up your Thanksgiving feast, check out Food Network’s recipe page dedicated to Turkey Day.

If we’re talking about Thanksgiving, we cannot avoid talking about Black Friday, which technically takes place at midnight on November 29. However, due to competitions, stores are now open on Thanksgiving Day. Some stores, including Macy’s, Walmart, Target, Kohl’s, and JC Penney, have announced Black Friday will start at 8 p.m. on Thursday. Consumers are expected to spend an average of $738, which is two percent less than 2012 holiday spending. Will you shorten your family time to capitalize on this annual sales? I won’t. I’m more of a Cyber Monday (December 2) kind of girl. End of Story

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

The Week Unpeeled

Just when the MF Global losses started losing headline dominance, a little $2 billion whale of a loss hit JP Morgan and financial headlines last week, also hitting the bank’s stock and Jamie Dimon’s reputation.  It now appears the derivative trades were “ordered” (WSJ weekend headline) to help save the bank from Euro-market problems.  However, some kudos to Dimon seem to be in order from a recovery issue, who admitted quickly on a conf call the problem (lots of recent examples of what not to do – Walmart, MF Global, etc.).  Still, big problems exist and Washington/Wall Street fight will only intensify.  The incident did not help the Dow, which suffered its worst week this week and lost 1.7 percent to end Friday at 12,820.

JP Morgan was among a few “mighty fall” stories of the week, all hitting the front pages, like Sarkozy in France, the Dewey & LeBoeuf collapse in New York and the Murdoch (you’re not a fit person to lead) unraveling in London (we learned this week that Rupert’s LOL meant “lots of love” when he corresponded with his former executive Rebekah Brooks).

Elsewhere:

  • Facebook execs took their hoodies on the road for its IPO this week, the biggest in history;
  • Obama came out backing same-sex marriage (great New Yorker cover this week, by the way, with rainbow color columns at the White House);
  • Shareholder uprisings over executive pay are forcing companies to rethink pay rises and bonuses as Aviva, Britain’s largest insurance company, drugs giant AstraZeneca and Trinity Mirror, publisher of the Daily Mirror and The People, have all recently lost their executives as part of the revolution
  • The Queen outlined the government's plans for the year ahead;
  • Britain’s rate-setting committee voted to keep interest rates at their record lows of half a percentage point; and
  • Vidal Sasson died (who used to say, “If you don’t look good, we don’t look good.” Certainly a great PR line and one worth remembering in client service. CJP
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

The Week Unpeeled

The big headlines in the business press continued to focus on bearish news on the European economy (and surprisingly not a whole lot on Walmart/Mexico) with the UK dipping back into recession and Spain posting a jobless rate of 25%, an 18-year high. In the US, a slowdown in growth (GDP rose only by an annualized 2.2 percent) in the first quarter but stocks nonetheless managed its biggest weekly advance in a month, the Dow rising 23 points Friday to end at 13,228 (Amazon results helped). No wonder that Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” is going on the block this week, expected to fetch as much as $80 million.

Elsewhere:

  • The Fed said it will keep short-term rates near zero until late 2014;
  • The US filed its first criminal charges tied to the BP oil spill, two years after the accident;
  • Apple’s quarterly profit nearly doubled, with iPhone shipments up 88 percent, thanks in part of China;
  • Sentiment in the UK has dropped following figures released this week that show that the UK is double-dipping down after a 0.2% contraction in the economy in the first quarter of the year;
  • Spain received more bad news with a credit downgrade from Standard and Poor's, and retail sales slumped for the 21st consecutive month;
  • Papers were dominated by Rupert Murdoch’s admission to the Leveson inquiry that there was a “cover up” at the News of the World and that he wished he closed the paper “years before.” He insisted he knew nothing about the scale of the phone-hacking until late 2010 and admitted it was a “serious blot on my reputation”; and
  • Cabinet minister Jeremy Hunt, under pressure this week for his dealings with Murdoch’s media empire, said he will hand over text messages and e-mails relating to his role in a failed bid by Mr. Murdoch to take full control of BSkyB, the UK’s main satellite broadcaster. CJP
Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print

I could not help but feel a sense of sympathy for Walmart’s communications team (IR, corporate comms, PR, internal comms) when reading this past Sunday’s front-cover New York Times story about the company’s bribery scandal (my colleague Jen highlighted the communication implications on Unboxed Thoughts yesterday). While I possess no inside knowledge beyond what the story outlined, I was repeatedly struck by what indicated to me an incident where top-level company officials thought they knew best and proceeded without counsel from a broader circle of advisors. As a communications practitioner, we have all been there. Company officials will often focus on only the legal consequences and not the impact on other constituents. The mindset is that legal trumps all, except when it’s only one facet of an issue like this one. In today’s world, communication is not a “siloed” discipline. Corporate governance is not the sole purview of legal. This responsibility now also falls to IR. But financial impact is no longer limited to IR and now trickles down to PR. My point is that communications is a chain; it’s all interwoven and as the old adage goes, you are only as strong as your weakest link. If you keep one constituency in the dark, you can bet that’s where the trouble will arise.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • email
  • Print